Courses

Courses for Spring 2018 

Undergraduate

  • PHIL 1. Short Introduction to Philosophy

    • An introductory course in western philosophy.

  • PHIL 3. Critical Thinking

    • Practical reasoning, argumentation, and the analysis of language as instruments of sound thinking in everyday life.

  • PHIL 4. Introduction to Ethics

    • An examination, at an introductory level, of such ethical issues as: why be moral, moral relativism, the nature of virtues and vices; and possibly consideration of practical ethical problems such as abortion or war.

  • PHIL 20C. History of Philosophy

    • From the Empiricists to Kant.

  • PHIL 100A. Ethics

    • An examination of the fundamental concepts, theories, and problems of moral or political philosophy.

  • PHIL 100E. Metaphysics

    • Introduction to the philosophical study of the most general and fundamental features of reality. Topics vary, but may include universals, particulars, identity and individuation, substance, the nature of persons, causation, and the nature of time.

  • PHIL 122. Theories of Justice

    • An examination, in detail, of one or more influential philosophical theories of justice.

  • PHIL 131. Advanced Topics in Applied Ethics

    • Advanced Topics in Applied Ethics.

  • PHIL 133. History of Political Thought

    • A study of one or more important figures from the history of political thought.

  • PHIL 141. History of Ethics

    • A study of one or more historically important moral philosophers.

  • PHIL 143. Philosophy of Law

    • An introduction to some of the main issues generated by the philosophical question, "What is law?" In what sense is conduct made obligatory by the existence of law? What, if any, is the relationship between law and morals? What are rules? What does it mean to say that a rule exists? Do courts really apply rules or merely pretend to do so?

  • PHIL 146. Philosophy in Literature

    • Introduction to major problems at the intersection of philosophy and literature. Issues addressed may include philosophical assessments of literature, authorship and interpretation, truth in fiction, significance of literary works and form for philosophy; texts include imaginative literature and philosophical essays.

  • PHIL 149. Action Theory

    • An examination of philosophical topics connected with human action, e.g. the role of intentions and desires in the explanation and justification of action and the nature of practical reason.

  • PHIL 164. Berkeley

    • The philosophy of Berkeley.

  • PHIL 183. Beginning Modern Logic

    • An introduction to the concepts and methods of modern symbolic logic. Emphasis is placed on problems of translating English expressions into logical symbols and on the development of skills in using the formal proof procedures of sentential and predicate logic.

  • PHIL 184. Intermediate Modern Logic

    • Further application and development of the predicate calculus, including the calculi of identity and description. An introduction to the metalogical questions of completeness, consistency, and decidability

Graduate

  • PHIL 222G. Theories of Justice

    • A study at the graduate level of an examination, in detail, of one or more influential philosophical theories of justice.

  • PHIL 231G. Advanced Topics in Applied Ethics

    • Advanced topics in applied ethics.

  • PHIL 233G. History of Political Thought

    • A study of one or more important figures from the history of political thought.

  • PHIL 241G. History of Ethics

    • A study of one or more historically important moral philosophers.

  • PHIL 249G. Action Theory

    • An examination of philosophical topics connected with human action, e.g. the role of intentions and desires in the explanation and justification of action and the nature of practical reasons.

  • PHIL 283G. Beginning Modern Logic

    • An introduction to symbolic logic at the graduate level.

  • PHIL 284G. Intermediate Modern Logic

    • A continuation of the study of symbolic logic.

  • PHIL 296A. Seminar in Ethics

    • Graduate seminar in ethics. Specific subject matter is selected by the instructor and descriptions are available in the department office before each quarter.

  • PHIL 296C. Seminar in Philosophy of Language

    • Graduate seminar in the philosophy of language. Specific subject matter is selected by the instructor and descriptions are available in the department office before each quarter.