Sherri Lynn Conklin

Sherri Lynn Conklin
Graduate Student in Residence

Office Hours

T 11 - 12
Th 11 - 12

Office Location

South Hall 5718

Specialization

Moral Theory: Metaethics, Normative Ethics, & Moral Psychology

Metaphilosophy

Area of Compentence:

Applied Ethics (esp. Computers & Technology)

Action Theory

Epistemology

Education

  • PhD, Philosophy, University of California, Santa Barbara, 2020 [Expected] 
  • MAPhilosophy, University of California Santa Barbara, 2016
  • MSc by Research, Philosophy, University of Edinburgh, Scotland, 2011
  • BAPhilosophy [Hons] & Psychology, Wheaton College, cum laude2010

Bio

I expect to earn my PhD from the Department of Philosophy at the University of California Santa Barbara by June 2020. I am a Moral Theorist – conducting research at the intersection of Metaethics, Normative Ethics, Moral Psychology, and Applied Ethics. I also conduct research on marginalization in the profession of philosophy as the Co-Director of the Demographics in Philosophy Project.

Research

In my dissertation, titled An Account of Unified Moral Assessment, I argue that rejecting vindicatory accounts of justification positions me to unify apparently contradictory patterns of moral assessment observed in dilemma cases, and, furthermore, makes room for straightforward solutions to many of the most challenging puzzles in ethics. I propose that the proper understanding of the conceptual relationships between various puzzling moral phenomena and their corresponding moral assessments reveals underlying unity in our patterns of assessment, providing evidence for a new moral framework.

Publications

Conklin, S., Artamonova, I., & Hassoun, N. (2019). “The State of the Discipline: New Data on Women Faculty in Philosophy.” Ergo (Forthcoming).

Wilhelm, I., Conklin, S., & Hassoun, N. (2018). “New Data on the Representation of Women in Philosophy Journals. Philosophical Studies, 175(6): 1441–1464.

Nelson, R., Reiss J. E., Gong, X., Conklin, S., & Parker, L., & Palmer, S. E. (2014). “The Shape of a Hole is Perceived as the Shape of its Interior.” Perception, 43: 1033–1048.